OC Woodturning

Extra Long Natural Wooden Soap Dish - Iroko African Teak

  • €35.00
- €-35.00

This beautiful soap dish is handcrafted from sustainably sourced African Iroko wooden. Iroko is a tropical hardwood from the west coast of Africa and is also known as African Teak. Its deep yellow colour darkens to a golden brown with chocolate tones over time. Iroko is most often used for boatbuilding because of its naturally occurring oils that make it resistant to water and rot decay, making it ideal for soap dishes too!

  • Handmade in Tipperary
  • Made from sustainably sourced Iroko timber
  • Iroko is naturally water resistant
  • Made from FSC certified timber
  • Vegan friendly - beeswax free

Each of these soap holders has been handcrafted from solid Iroko wood sourced from FSC managed forests in central and western Africa, double-sanded and finished with two coats of Danish Oil with a semi-matt sheen. The Danish Oil finish helps to seal the wood and add a further level of protection to the dish. Finished with Hampshire Sheen Danish oil, a sustainable wood finishing oil made from pure Tung Tree Oil with no artificial varnish, reins or other vegetable oils and dearomatized white spirit.  It is both food safe and toy safe EN71 standard when dry.

As these dishes are made from natural wood, colours will vary.

The soap dish features a tapered base and scalloped grooves to allow water to drain freely away helping your soap to dry better and last longer. We like to use ours with a Safix soap pad too.

The Extra Long wooden soap dish measuring 26cm fits three to four bars of soap making it ideal when you have multiple soaps or solid shampoo on the go. The extra long version features additional drainage holes.

Measurements

  • Standard: 110mm x 90mm x 23mm approx
  • Extra Long: 260mm x 90mm x 23mm approx


About our Maker

This soap dish is designed and made by Paddy O’C just outside of Cahir in Co. Tipperary. Since he was a child Paddy has had a fascination with timber and going to the forest. “This stemmed from hanging out with my father & Grandfather at the age of 10/11 every September or October going for firewood. Nowadays, rather than having beautiful trees be cut up for firewood, I prefer to repurpose them as functional artistic pieces in peoples homes.”  Paddy has been woodcrafting since 1998 when he began his apprenticeship with a master craftsman in Bansha. Paddy only works with sustainably sourced timber including salvaged wood.